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Conservation Research Institute

 

Climate risk index shows threats to 90 per cent of the world's marine species

Biodiversity News - Wed, 05/10/2022 - 19:07
A new biodiversity index captures the climate risk for nearly 25,000 marine species and their ecosystems and lays the groundwork for climate-smart approaches to management and conservation. Daniel G. Boyce, Research Scientist, Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Adjunct Professor, Dalhousie University Licensed as Creative Commons – attribution, no derivatives.

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation Related Talks and Seminars - Wed, 05/10/2022 - 10:34
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

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Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation-related talks - Wed, 05/10/2022 - 10:34
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation Talks - Wed, 05/10/2022 - 10:34
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation at Cambridge - Wed, 05/10/2022 - 10:34
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

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Labor's plan to save threatened species is an improvement – but it's still well short of what we need

Biodiversity News - Wed, 05/10/2022 - 05:07
Yes, the new threatened species plan is better. But it’s nowhere near enough to actually prevent Australian species from dying out Euan Ritchie, Professor in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life & Environmental Sciences, Deakin University Megan C Evans, Senior Lecturer and ARC DECRA Fellow, UNSW Sydney Yung En Chee, Senior Research Fellow, Environmental Science, The University of Melbourne Licensed as Creative Commons – attribution, no derivatives.

Fri 18 Nov 16:00: APS DFD - no seminar

Conservation at Cambridge - Tue, 04/10/2022 - 22:11
APS DFD - no seminar

Abstract not available

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Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation Related Talks and Seminars - Tue, 04/10/2022 - 13:04
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation-related talks - Tue, 04/10/2022 - 13:04
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation Talks - Tue, 04/10/2022 - 13:04
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation at Cambridge - Tue, 04/10/2022 - 13:04
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation Related Talks and Seminars - Tue, 04/10/2022 - 13:04
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation-related talks - Tue, 04/10/2022 - 13:04
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation Talks - Tue, 04/10/2022 - 13:04
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 06 Oct 18:45: What midges can tell us about past environments Admission Free

Conservation at Cambridge - Tue, 04/10/2022 - 13:04
What midges can tell us about past environments

Stefan Engels is a palaeoecologist who studies the response of natural ecosystems to abrupt environmental change.

In this talk Stefan will explain how fossils of chironomids (non-biting midges) can be used to tell us more about past climate change and how they can contribute to a better understanding of Insect Armageddon.

Admission Free

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 07 Oct 10:00: Ocean water masses reveal the geographic pattern of water cycle change

Conservation Related Talks and Seminars - Mon, 03/10/2022 - 11:25
Ocean water masses reveal the geographic pattern of water cycle change

Anthropogenic climate change threatens to disrupt the global water cycle and consequently the human and ecological systems which rely on freshwater. Salinity observations offer a route to quantifying historical water cycle change in the face of scarce direct observations of rainfall, runoff and evaporation. Due to the dynamic nature of ocean circulation and mixing, however, robustly relating local (i.e. in a Eulerian reference frame) surface salinity changes to local fresh water fluxes remains challenging. In this presentation, we harness water mass-based methods to define insightful metrics for water cycle change based on ocean salinity observations.

First, we explore whether fresh regions of the ocean are getting fresher and salty regions are getting saltier by analysing the distribution of sea water as a function of salinity. As the contrast between fresh and salty regions intensifies, the distribution becomes wider. This widening in the distribution can be expressed as a metric which can be attributed to water cycle change.

Second, we investigate the climatological regions these changes in fresh water transport occur between, namely, the hot tropics, warm sub-tropical regions or cool sub-polar regions. To do this we consider the ‘T-S’ curve of classical oceanography. From 1970 to 2014, the T-S curve has become ‘curvier’, indicating a dramatic shift in fresh water from the warm to cold oceans – a trend not captured by climate reconstructions.

Finally, we present a new method based on optimal transport theory which allows us to attribute air-sea water flux changes to geographically distinct regions. The method optimises the contributions of mixing, circulation and air-sea heat and fresh water fluxes necessary to explain observed changes in the ocean’s water mass distribution. Based on this approach, we provide new estimates of the geographical distribution of water flux changes over the ocean surface.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 07 Oct 10:00: Ocean water masses reveal the geographic pattern of water cycle change

Conservation-related talks - Mon, 03/10/2022 - 11:25
Ocean water masses reveal the geographic pattern of water cycle change

Anthropogenic climate change threatens to disrupt the global water cycle and consequently the human and ecological systems which rely on freshwater. Salinity observations offer a route to quantifying historical water cycle change in the face of scarce direct observations of rainfall, runoff and evaporation. Due to the dynamic nature of ocean circulation and mixing, however, robustly relating local (i.e. in a Eulerian reference frame) surface salinity changes to local fresh water fluxes remains challenging. In this presentation, we harness water mass-based methods to define insightful metrics for water cycle change based on ocean salinity observations.

First, we explore whether fresh regions of the ocean are getting fresher and salty regions are getting saltier by analysing the distribution of sea water as a function of salinity. As the contrast between fresh and salty regions intensifies, the distribution becomes wider. This widening in the distribution can be expressed as a metric which can be attributed to water cycle change.

Second, we investigate the climatological regions these changes in fresh water transport occur between, namely, the hot tropics, warm sub-tropical regions or cool sub-polar regions. To do this we consider the ‘T-S’ curve of classical oceanography. From 1970 to 2014, the T-S curve has become ‘curvier’, indicating a dramatic shift in fresh water from the warm to cold oceans – a trend not captured by climate reconstructions.

Finally, we present a new method based on optimal transport theory which allows us to attribute air-sea water flux changes to geographically distinct regions. The method optimises the contributions of mixing, circulation and air-sea heat and fresh water fluxes necessary to explain observed changes in the ocean’s water mass distribution. Based on this approach, we provide new estimates of the geographical distribution of water flux changes over the ocean surface.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 07 Oct 10:00: Ocean water masses reveal the geographic pattern of water cycle change

Conservation Talks - Mon, 03/10/2022 - 11:25
Ocean water masses reveal the geographic pattern of water cycle change

Anthropogenic climate change threatens to disrupt the global water cycle and consequently the human and ecological systems which rely on freshwater. Salinity observations offer a route to quantifying historical water cycle change in the face of scarce direct observations of rainfall, runoff and evaporation. Due to the dynamic nature of ocean circulation and mixing, however, robustly relating local (i.e. in a Eulerian reference frame) surface salinity changes to local fresh water fluxes remains challenging. In this presentation, we harness water mass-based methods to define insightful metrics for water cycle change based on ocean salinity observations.

First, we explore whether fresh regions of the ocean are getting fresher and salty regions are getting saltier by analysing the distribution of sea water as a function of salinity. As the contrast between fresh and salty regions intensifies, the distribution becomes wider. This widening in the distribution can be expressed as a metric which can be attributed to water cycle change.

Second, we investigate the climatological regions these changes in fresh water transport occur between, namely, the hot tropics, warm sub-tropical regions or cool sub-polar regions. To do this we consider the ‘T-S’ curve of classical oceanography. From 1970 to 2014, the T-S curve has become ‘curvier’, indicating a dramatic shift in fresh water from the warm to cold oceans – a trend not captured by climate reconstructions.

Finally, we present a new method based on optimal transport theory which allows us to attribute air-sea water flux changes to geographically distinct regions. The method optimises the contributions of mixing, circulation and air-sea heat and fresh water fluxes necessary to explain observed changes in the ocean’s water mass distribution. Based on this approach, we provide new estimates of the geographical distribution of water flux changes over the ocean surface.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 07 Oct 10:00: Ocean water masses reveal the geographic pattern of water cycle change

Conservation at Cambridge - Mon, 03/10/2022 - 11:25
Ocean water masses reveal the geographic pattern of water cycle change

Anthropogenic climate change threatens to disrupt the global water cycle and consequently the human and ecological systems which rely on freshwater. Salinity observations offer a route to quantifying historical water cycle change in the face of scarce direct observations of rainfall, runoff and evaporation. Due to the dynamic nature of ocean circulation and mixing, however, robustly relating local (i.e. in a Eulerian reference frame) surface salinity changes to local fresh water fluxes remains challenging. In this presentation, we harness water mass-based methods to define insightful metrics for water cycle change based on ocean salinity observations.

First, we explore whether fresh regions of the ocean are getting fresher and salty regions are getting saltier by analysing the distribution of sea water as a function of salinity. As the contrast between fresh and salty regions intensifies, the distribution becomes wider. This widening in the distribution can be expressed as a metric which can be attributed to water cycle change.

Second, we investigate the climatological regions these changes in fresh water transport occur between, namely, the hot tropics, warm sub-tropical regions or cool sub-polar regions. To do this we consider the ‘T-S’ curve of classical oceanography. From 1970 to 2014, the T-S curve has become ‘curvier’, indicating a dramatic shift in fresh water from the warm to cold oceans – a trend not captured by climate reconstructions.

Finally, we present a new method based on optimal transport theory which allows us to attribute air-sea water flux changes to geographically distinct regions. The method optimises the contributions of mixing, circulation and air-sea heat and fresh water fluxes necessary to explain observed changes in the ocean’s water mass distribution. Based on this approach, we provide new estimates of the geographical distribution of water flux changes over the ocean surface.

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Fri 14 Oct 16:00: Instability, mixing and fragmentation in planetary collisions

Conservation at Cambridge - Sun, 02/10/2022 - 13:05
Instability, mixing and fragmentation in planetary collisions

The Earth formed by high-energy collisions between planetary embryos. I will present laboratory experiments on the fluid dynamics of these collisions. I will show that the impact of a liquid volume onto a liquid pool reproduces the cratering observed in numerical simulations and at the surface of planets. Unlike simulations, experiments produce turbulent mixing. From our findings, we infer the drop size and the degree of mixing within the forming Earth. These parameters controlled the composition of the Earth’s interior.

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