skip to content

Conservation Research Institute

 
Subscribe to Conservation at Cambridge feed
UCCRI is an Interdisciplinary Research Centre, with a network of over 150 researchers from all 6 Schools of the University of Cambridge. The Institute supports multidisciplinary research on biodiversity conservation and the social context within which humans engage with nature. It works from a base in the David Attenborough Building, which is designed to enhance collaboration and the sharing of perspectives across organisational and disciplinary boundaries.
Updated: 50 min 51 sec ago

Mon 12 Oct 13:00: Gravity-driven flows and mixing in layered porous media

Sat, 10/10/2020 - 11:59
Gravity-driven flows and mixing in layered porous media

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 16 Oct 14:00: Welcome event

Fri, 09/10/2020 - 17:58
Welcome event

Come find out what the Cambridge Centre for Climate Science is about and meet other people in Cambridge working on climate research

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 21 Oct 14:00: Seasonal prediction and predictability of regional Antarctic sea ice The talk will be online. Contact the host to get Zoom details.

Wed, 07/10/2020 - 16:33
Seasonal prediction and predictability of regional Antarctic sea ice

Compared to the Arctic, seasonal predictions of Antarctic sea ice have received relatively little attention. In this talk, I will use three coupled dynamical prediction systems developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to assess the seasonal prediction skill and predictability of Antarctic sea ice. These systems, based on the FLOR , SPEAR-lo, and SPEAR -med dynamical models, differ in their coupled model components, initialization techniques, atmospheric resolution, and model biases. This allows for an investigation of these factors in determining Antarctic sea ice prediction skill. Using suites of retrospective initialized seasonal predictions spanning 1992-2018, we find that each system is capable of skillfully predicting regional Antarctic sea ice extent (SIE) with skill that generically exceeds that of a persistence forecast. Winter SIE is skillfully predicted up to 11 months in advance in the Weddell, Amundsen and Bellingshausen, Indian, and West Pacific sectors, whereas winter skill is notably lower in the Ross sector. Zonally advected upper ocean heat content anomalies are found to provide the crucial source of prediction skill for the winter sea ice edge position. The SPEAR systems are notably more skillful than FLOR for summer sea ice predictions, owing to improvements in sea ice concentration and sea ice thickness initialization. Summer Weddell SIE can be skillfully predicted up to 8 months in advance in SPEAR -med, due to the persistence and drift of initialized sea ice thickness anomalies from the previous winter. Overall, these results suggest a promising potential for providing operational regional Antarctic sea ice predictions on seasonal timescales.

The talk will be online. Contact the host to get Zoom details.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 29 Oct 13:00: Does stress lead to wrinkles?. The case of petal cuticles

Wed, 07/10/2020 - 08:50
Does stress lead to wrinkles?. The case of petal cuticles

Every mechanical problem, the deformation is the result of forces acting upon every point of the volume under investigation. The case of patterned petal cell surfaces, can be understood as mechanical instabilities induced by such forces in combination of geometrical constraints and material properties. Such forces could be the result of internal processes or externally imposed. In this talk we present results of taking into account both cases to describe shapes found in petals which exhibit structural colour, we explore the relationship of such structures with those found in synthetic systems and how such relationships of could be exploited to to systematically study aspects of evolution and development in plants.

Contact se389@cam.ac.uk for the Zoom link if you are not on our mailing list.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 05 Nov 13:00: Defying Mendel’s laws: epigenetic insights from the sulfurea paramutation in Solanum Lycopersicum

Tue, 06/10/2020 - 08:30
Defying Mendel’s laws: epigenetic insights from the sulfurea paramutation in Solanum Lycopersicum

Gene silencing events can distort meiotically heritable epigenetic responses by altering gene expression without involving changes in DNA sequences. Paramutation is such a gene silencing process, found across kingdoms, that involves the trans silencing of an active (paramutable) allele caused by a silent (paramutagenic) allele. The silent-state of the paramutable allele is heritable and this allele can become paramutagenic in subsequent generations thereby altering Mendelian patterns of inheritance. The establishment and maintenance of paramutation has been mostly explained by models invoking small RNA (sRNA) mediated silencing to explain the transfer of epigenetic marks between homologue chromosomes.

This talk will address a particular case of paramutation, the sulfurea (sulf) allele, which is a silent and paramutagenic epigenetic variant of a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv Lukullus) gene involved in chlorophyll synthesis. Using genetic analysis, sRNA sequencing, chromatin conformation capture (HiC/4C) in chlorotic leave tissues, I will discuss the molecular mechanism underlying the maintenance of paramutation.

Contact se389@cam.ac.uk for the Zoom link if you are not on our mailing list.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 03 Dec 13:00: Plant Sciences Seminar: Plant health

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 15:07
Plant Sciences Seminar: Plant health

Organized by Mariana Fazenda.

Contact se389@cam.ac.uk for the Zoom link if you are not on our mailing list.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 26 Nov 13:00: Plant Sciences Seminar

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 15:06
Plant Sciences Seminar

Contact se389@cam.ac.uk for the Zoom link if you are not on our mailing list.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 19 Nov 13:00: Plant Sciences Seminar

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 15:04
Plant Sciences Seminar

Contact se389@cam.ac.uk for the Zoom link if you are not on our mailing list.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 05 Nov 13:00: Plant Sciences Seminar

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 15:03
Plant Sciences Seminar

Contact se389@cam.ac.uk for the Zoom link if you are not on our mailing list.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 29 Oct 13:00: Plant Sciences Seminar

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 15:00
Plant Sciences Seminar

Contact se389@cam.ac.uk for the Zoom link if you are not on our mailing list.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 15 Oct 13:00: A bipartite transcription factor module controls bundle sheath preferential expression in Arabidopsis

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 15:00
A bipartite transcription factor module controls bundle sheath preferential expression in Arabidopsis

C4 photosynthesis evolved repeatedly from the ancestral C3 state, improving photosynthetic efficiency by ~50%. In most C4 lineages photosynthesis is compartmented between mesophyll and bundle sheath cells but how gene expression is restricted to these cell types is poorly understood. Using the C3 model Arabidopsis thaliana we have identified cis-elements and transcription factors driving expression in bundle sheath strands. Upstream of the bundle sheath preferentially expressed MYB76 gene we identified a region necessary and sufficient for expression containing two cis-elements associated with the MYC and MYB families of transcription factors. MYB76 expression is reduced in mutant alleles for each. Moreover, down-regulated genes shared by both mutants are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath. These findings are broadly relevant for understanding the spatial patterning of gene expression, provide specific insights into mechanisms associated with evolution of C4 photosynthesis and identify a short tuneable sequence for manipulating gene expression in the bundle sheath.

Contact se389@cam.ac.uk for the Zoom link if you are not on our mailing list.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mon 16 Nov 13:00: Double-Diffusive Convection in the Arctic Ocean

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 14:29
Double-Diffusive Convection in the Arctic Ocean

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mon 30 Nov 13:00: Limitations of the Miles-Howard criterion

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 14:18
Limitations of the Miles-Howard criterion

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mon 30 Nov 13:00: TBA

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 13:35
TBA

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mon 16 Nov 13:00: TBA

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 13:34
TBA

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mon 09 Nov 13:00: Jet Regimes and the Predictability of Euro-Atlantic Weather

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 13:32
Jet Regimes and the Predictability of Euro-Atlantic Weather

In recent years, numerical weather prediction models have begun to show notable levels of skill at predicting the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) when initialised one month ahead. Because the NAO gives a good first-order approximation of European winter weather, this has garnered a lot of interest. At the same time, model predictions exhibit unusually low signal-to-noise ratios, in what has been dubbed a `signal-to-noise paradox’. We present a new framework for understanding this behaviour in terms of the regime dynamics of the trimodal, North Atlantic eddy-driven jet. It is shown that systematically weak persistence in models may be a key factor in producing the signal-to-noise paradox, and that this is likely in part due to weak transient eddy forcing in models. Sources of predictability in this regime system are also discussed.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mon 02 Nov 13:00: Dune-dune interactions: experiments and modelling

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 13:30
Dune-dune interactions: experiments and modelling

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mon 19 Oct 13:00: The ocean’s transient conveyor belt

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 13:28
The ocean’s transient conveyor belt

Climate models consistently project a robust weakening in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) during the 21st century in response to greenhouse gas forcing. Here we elucidate the transient components of the global ocean overturning circulation and propose a transient conveyor belt, in which the AMOC is dynamically linked to the ITF on centennial timescales. Using a hierarchy of ocean and climate models, we show that there is a transient overturning compensation between the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific basins. In a warming climate, the AMOC weakens, but the Indo-Pacific develops an anomalous overturning circulation that opposes the Atlantic changes. The Indo-Pacific circulation is characterized by a northward transport anomaly close to surface. When considering the Indian and Pacific basins separately, the northward surface transport anomaly is largely confined to the Indian Ocean due to a basin-scale vorticity balance that constrains the surface transport in the Pacific. This surface transport response increases the sea surface height in the Indian Ocean and leads to a weakened ITF . We illustrate these dynamics using a 1.5-layer reduced gravity model and show that this idealized model agrees well with the response in multiple comprehensive general circulation models. Our results highlight the importance of transient inter-basin exchanges, especially on decadal to centennial time scales, in regulating the global ocean circulation in a changing climate.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mon 12 Oct 13:00: Gravity-driven flows and mixing in layered porous media

Mon, 05/10/2020 - 13:26
Gravity-driven flows and mixing in layered porous media

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list